in the heart of the South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites

in the heart of the South Tyrolean Mountains and Dolomites

permanent Exhibition mountain mania

Postcard Wall

With the invention of the picture postcard in the late 19th century, mountain marketing was taken to the next level. Mountain motifs, which were depicted in the tradition of landscape painting, soon became highly popular and brought the mountains closer to the people, creating an “accessibility hitherto unknown”

Mountain postcards made people feel like they were actually there and made them want to go there themselves someday to see the beauty of the mountains with their own eyes.

With the invention of the picture postcard in the late 19th century, mountain marketing was taken to the next level. Mountain motifs, which were depicted in the tradition of landscape painting, soon became highly popular and brought the mountains closer to the people, creating an “accessibility hitherto unknown” (Jon Mathieu). Mountain postcards made people feel like they were actually there and made them want to go there themselves someday to see the beauty of the mountains with their own eyes.

The virtuous/vicious circle went like this: A photographer wanted to earn money with mountain photographs. They had to be of very high quality and show a special view. For want of his own distribution company, the photographer would sell or license his photograph to a publisher. From their vacation spots people would send countless picture postcards to relatives and friends far away. That way the mountains, places, and alpine huts pictured on the postcards became popular and even famous.

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Matterhorn mania

Car manufacturers as well as banks use them to advertise their products. Cheeses and beer brands, mineral water, and, of course, chocolate. Mountains – presented in a variety of ways – can apparently serve as the backdrop for any advertising campaign.

“Simple Beauty”, for example, or “Pure Power” are modifiers that can easily be translated into emotionally charged mountain motifs. For this we have already internalized all the necessary images and experiences. Brands and their creators depend on that. So what is the problem? Just because there is a Matterhorn on the package does not mean there is chocolate inside. Maybe it’s coffee, beer, a piece of Switzerland, a little insurance, an airline, towns (even Zermatt), Ricola, cheese, all kinds of sporting goods, a contest, and much, much more.

Although millions are invested in creating a brand’s unique selling point, the advertising sector grossly overuses the image of the Alps, and often without any apparent correlation. Why “a well-built Spaniard” (in reference to a car brand from Asia) should be photoshopped into a panorama of the Bernese Alps is anyone’s guess. It is, however, easy to understand that mountain motifs can be readily combined with a wide range of attributes and any number of random products.

Matterhorn
1231 m

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